Memorial Park Bench, Burlington Ontario

A black and white photographic study of a a park bench memorial located along the shore of Lake Ontario, Burlington.

Memorial Park Bench.

The photographer projects himself into everything he sees, identifying himself with everything in order to know it and to feel it better. – Minor White

I found this image; “Memorial Park Bench,” walking along a path with Audrey and the dogs on a sunny Sunday afternoon in the park.  It didn’t take long to compose; the shadow was perfect, the bench was perfect, the geometric pattern of the cement ground was perfect.  This was another photo given to me. read more

Warehouse Parking Lot Crossing

“Warehouse Parking Lot Crossing.”

The process of photographing is a pleasure: eyes open, receptive, sensing, and at some point, connecting. It’s thrilling to be outside your mind, your eyes far ahead of your thoughts.

Henry Wessel

I came across the quotes of this photographer yesterday and I liked them.  Sometimes you just know, you connect with the image in front of you, everything becomes clear and you know it is going to work.  “Warehouse Parking Lot Crossing” is one of those images.

Once upon a time I was a commercial photographer, a burnt out commercial photographer.  Everything had become a formula, my creativity was getting harder and harder to find.  Everything had become mundane, I wasted my time in front of this laptop doing nothing.  I was becoming angry. I put down my cameras, sold some of them and stopped photographing. read more

Harbor Lookout in Burlington Ontario

Harbour Lookout.

I am not a landscape photographer. I am interested in people. I am interested in our civilisation. I am interested in what traces we leave in landscapes, in cities and places. But I wait until people have gone, until they are out of the shot. So the place can start talking about us. Places are so much more able to evoke people when people are out. As soon as there is one person in the shot everybody looks at that person. If there is nobody in the shot, the beholder is able to listen to the story of that place. And that’s my job. I try to make places tell their stories about us. So I am not a landscape photographer. I am really interested in people, but my way of finding out things about people is that I do photos about their absence, about their traces. read more